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Protected: Components of a Behaviour Change Plan

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Roadspace Reallocation in Scotland

In the recording below, we hear from Anna Gale from Public Health Scotland, who give an overview of the findings and recommendations from the Health Impact Assessment.

Find out more about the Health Impact Assessment and Rapid Evidence Review here: https://www.publichealthscotland.scot/publications/road-space-reallocation-in-scotland/

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Engage • Inspire • Learn News PfE Places for Everyone

Active Travel in Europe

Introduction

We hear from a fantastic line up of speakers who present and share experiences of the increase of temporary active travel interventions and strategies during the pandemic in Europe, and how these can shape the way for future long-term measures and solutions. By coming together and learning from each other, it may be possible to keep this momentum going – to transform temporary solutions into more permanent implementations and accelerate the development of sustainable active travel infrastructure across Europe.

The event poster for the Active Travel in Europe webinar series
The event poster for the Active Travel in Europe webinar series

Paris

Clotilde Imbert, Director of Copenhagenize France, presents case studies from Paris, a city that has seen an increase in temporary cycle paths but also a high increase in cycling since the beginning of the pandemic. In addition, the mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, has an ambitious strategy, ‘Plan Vélo’ to transform Paris into a cycle-friendly city.

According to European Cyclists’ Federation, since the pandemic, France has added €300m in funding for the country’s cycling infrastructure. In the opinion column, ‘A unique opportunity to speed up the implementation of bicycle plans‘ on Copenhagenize’s website, Clotilde expands on her view of the possibilities and strategies that she believes should take place as a next step in creating permanent active travel infrastructure in France.

Brussels

Florine Cuignet, Policy Officer of GRACQ, shares how GRACQ represents cyclists and promotes cycling in the french-speaking parts of Belgium. According to European Cyclists’ Federation, Brussels is one of the cities that implemented the most cycle lanes during the pandemic in Europe. In addition, the country added almost €480m in their cycling infrastructure budget in response to the pandemic.

Last year the Belgian federal government, for the first time, published a cycling action plan for the country. The plan consists of 52 action points that will facilitate and promote cycling, which will be implemented by 2024.

EuroVelo

Ed Lancaster, Director of EuroVelo at the independent non-profit association European Cyclists’ Federation, presents case studies from rural areas in Europe. EuroVelo (European cycle route network) is a cooperation between different national and regional partners. The aim is to ensure that there are very high quality European-grade cycle routes and networks across Europe.

In January, EuroVelo presented the news that cycling on the EuroVelo routes have continued rising since the pandemic. In addition, ECF is also partner for the cross-border BIGIMUGI project that ‘aims at developing cycling mobility for all in rural areas situated along EuroVelo 3’.

Berlin

Ragnhild Sørensen shares more about work that the Berlin-based organisation, Changing Cities, do. As many other cities, Berlin has created pop-up cycle lanes during the pandemic, something that has not been appreciated by all political parties. The pop-up cycle lanes were monitored and developed according to feedback. The organisation has also launched the campaign Kiezblocks in Berlin, where more than 50 local initiatives want to limit the permeability of the road network for motorised individual transport (MIT) while prioritising walking and cycling on non-arterial streets. Kiezblock is a strategy for transformational urban adaptation, initiated by locals.

Panel Session

In this panel session, we welcome back all keynote speakers to answer pre-submitted and unanswered questions. The panel session will also include discussion around key themes identified throughout the series, including:

– Shared learning

– Behaviour and culture

– Opportunities and constraints

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Behaviour Change Interventions – Information Sheets

Evidence suggests that the most efficient mechanism for boosting active travel is a mix of interventions that complement each other (e.g. infrastructure interventions and behavioural interventions like a route planning training).

In Places for Everyone we therefore ask applicants to design a mix of behavioural interventions alongside their infrastructure projects, and present these in a behaviour change plan.

Intentionally developing and implementing a plan of activities will increase the use of new infrastructure at the outset and ultimately increase the impact it has.

Start by considering your local context (the local people and organisations), engage and listen. Design a plan just as you would design infrastructure; in a context specific way and in response to feedback. This may it take more time but is well worth it and important.

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Community Engagement & Behaviour Change in Places for Everyone

Introduction

This mini-series is presented as six bite-sized, interactive tutorials on understanding and delivering community engagement and behaviour change in Places for Everyone projects.

This includes a practical guide to behaviour change strategies and interventions, as well as insight into community engagement, co-production, and the types of community sector organisations. Please note that you can find the references and relevant resources at the bottom of this page.

This mini-series is currently a work in progress. Your feedback will help shape future sessions.

Developing a Behaviour Change Plan

In this session, we cover:

  • Why behaviour change plans are important;
  • What behaviour change plans should include;
  • Community engagement vs behaviour change;
  • Involving seldom-heard groups;
  • Selecting interventions; and
  • Key points to remember.

Putting Theory into Practice

The session above, “Developing a Behaviour Change Plan”, mentions that one of the most effective mechanisms for boosting active travel is a mix of measures that complement each other. Infrastructure is just one measure we can use. In this session, we take a practical look at how to put together an effective programme that will result in a greater diversity of people using the infrastructure.

Introduction to Behaviour Change

In this session, we cover:

  • What is behaviour change?
  • ISM and Shifting Normal models
  • COM-B and the Behaviour Change Wheel
  • Tying it all together using a real life example
  • Making things happen

Introduction to Community Sector Organisations

In this session we’re going to look at community organisations in a bit more depth. We cover:

  • Explanation of the terms Community Sector, Third sector and Voluntary sector
  • Types of community organisation
  • Legal structures
  • Social enterprises and BIDs

Community Engagement and Co-production

Coming soon!

References and relevant resources

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Engage • Inspire • Learn PfE Places for Everyone

An introduction to making the case for active travel

Partners from local authorities and organisations around Scotland were invited to hear from two guest speakers on how to make the case for active travel.

During the event, delegates were also given the opportunity to join smaller groups to share their own experiences, knowledge and relevant resources.

Setting the scene

Dr David Caesar, Senior Strategic Advisor of Scottish Government shares the benefits of active travel, including how active travel improves public health and tackles health inequalities.

Making the case to residents and the local population

From messaging and communication to focusing on the positives, Dr Paul Kelly, Director of Paths for All and Lecturer in Physical Activity for Health at the University of Edinburgh, advises on how to make the case for active travel to local residents.

Final discussion & questions

Our guest speakers answer questions submitted throughout the event and share final learnings.

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20mph roll out in the Scottish Borders

We hear from Philippa Gilhooly, Team Leader, Traffic and Road Safety, Scottish Borders Council and Greg Fountas, Lecturer, School of Engineering & the Built Environment, Edinburgh Napier University, who share how they used data and public feedback to convert this temporary 20mph trial to permanent.

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Effective behaviour change

Partners from local authorities and organisations around Scotland were invited to hear from a variety of guest speakers who shared their experience and expertise in influencing attitudes, habits and behaviour.

These sessions are part of the Places for Everyone event programme – Engage · Inspire · Learn

Why it’s important to influence public behaviour

First, we hear from Susanne Mueller, Communities Coordinator, Sustrans Scotland. Susanne highlights two key reasons why it’s important to influence public behaviour, in relation to Active Travel:

  1. Tackling the climate crisis
  2. Improving public health

Leven’s Behaviour Change Action Plan

Next, Susanne is joined by Daniel Prince, Infrastructure Coordinator, Sustrans Scotland and Enid Trevett, Community Engagement Officer, Coalfield Regeneration Trust. They share how the Coalfield Regeneration Trust has successfully co-developed Leven’s Behaviour Change Action Plan. This includes embedding the following values into the Behaviour Change Action Plan:

  1. Local first;
  2. Involve young people;
  3. Using what is already available; and
  4. The spirit of community needs to be fostered through the way actions are delivered.

Cycling Scotland’s Behaviour Change Initiatives

Last, we hear from Katharine Brough, Head of Behaviour Change at Cycling Scotland. Katharine speaks about the Cycling Friendly programme and how the award and grant funding programme works with organisations in a variety of workplace, education and community settings across Scotland. The programme aims to address barriers to cycling and increase access to bikes and cycling rates. The session also touches on the available tools for creating and sustaining behaviour change.

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What does inclusivity look like in public space?

Partners from local authorities and organisations around Scotland were invited to hear from a variety of guest speakers on how to create more inclusive spaces.

These sessions are part of the Places for Everyone event programme – Engage · Inspire · Learn

Design Justice Network

First, we hear from Leah Lockhart and Raina Armstrong, both members of the Design Justice Network. Design Justice is an exploration of how design might be led by marginalized communities, dismantle structural inequality and advance collective liberation. The Design Justice principles are a practical framework for planning work and decision making. Below, you can find the recording of the session and you can access additional resources here.

Queering Public Space

How do you make transport and public space more inclusive? Are there design aspects that can help to make these safer and more welcoming? Can the organisation of transport and public space help to desist hate crimes and gender-based violence? We hear from Dr Ammar Azzouz and Mei-Yee Man Oram of Arup, and Professor Pippa Catterall of University of Westminster. They draw upon recent research to explore these various pressing issues. Below, you can find the recording of the session and you can access the full Queering the Public Space report here.

Make Space for Girls

Last, we hear from Imogen Clark and Susannah Walker, co-founders of a new charity, Make Space for Girls. It was set up to campaign for parks and similar public spaces to be welcoming to girls and young women. Many parks, play equipment and public spaces are designed for the default male. Therefore, Make Space for Girls use research, consultation, engagement and education to drive an approach to the planning and development of parks and similar public spaces. Undoubtedly, these spaces should recognise the different needs of girls and young women and should find ways to meet those needs. Below, you can find the recording of the session.

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Completion of Phase 1 of Connecting Woodside

Connecting Woodside, previously known as Woodside Mini-Holland, was funded by Sustrans Scotland through Places for Everyone, and Glasgow City Council. The Places for Everyone programme is funded by Transport Scotland.