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Places for Everyone fund update

We are reopening!

After more than a year away, the Places for Everyone fund is set to open again to new and existing project applications for Concept (Stages 0-2) from 25th July 2022.

To prepare for this, our team are working hard to ensure that updated Application Guidance is made available to partners as soon as possible.

This updated guidance will be made available to all partners on 11th July 2022.

In the meantime, partners can use our existing guidance or refer to Cycling by Design.

From the opening date of 25th July 2022, partners will then have four weeks to submit their applications for the deadline of 23rd August 2022.

A Decision Making Panel will be held on 31st October 2022.

Updated programme aim

We have brought our programme aim up to date to emphasise that projects which receive Places for Everyone funding should be truly for everyone.

All Places for Everyone projects must deliver capital infrastructure which helps to achieve this aim to:

Create safer, more attractive, healthier, and inclusive places which are enjoyed equitably by increasing and diversifying the number of trips made by walking, wheeling or cycling for everyday journeys.  

Examples of the types of projects Places for Everyone is able to fund can be found on the Our Projects page.

New Expression of Interest

We will be launching an online Expression of Interest form via our partner-facing Places for Everyone page on 11th July 2022.

A new shorter Expression of Interest form will allow partners to submit a basic project proposal to Places for Everyone and receive a response within one week as to whether the proposed project is something Places for Everyone can fund.

Whilst submitting an Expression of Interest is not mandatory, it is strongly recommended and will help us to process your Full Application more quickly.

The only information required from an Expression of Interest proposal will be the contact details of your organisation and a basic description of the project proposed, including it’s aims and which Stage(s) funding is being applied for.

If your Expression of Interest is successful, you will be invited to submit a Full Application via the Project Portal.

There are three separate project applications groupings which can be applied for through Places for Everyone. Concept (Stages 0-2); Design (Stages 3-4); and Construction (5-7).

Clearer eligibility for community organisations

To support community organisations to understand whether they are eligible we will be launching a quick and anonymous Eligibility Assessment on Monday 11th July 2022.  

This Eligibility Assessment will ask community groups to complete a short set of ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ questions and receive an immediate response on whether they are eligible to apply for funding.

Eligible community organisations will then be invited to submit an Expression of Interest form, provided they already have a project vision in mind.

The Eligibility Assessment will consider the following requirements:

  • Ability to manage long-term financial obligations
  • Possession of Public Liability Insurance
  • Support from relevant local authority
  • Understanding of CDM regulations
  • Possession of a signed constitution
  • Required number of board members in accordance with constitution

Key dates

Applications, Deadlines and Panels

  • Applications for new and existing Concept (Stage 0-2) projects open on July 25th 2022.
  • Updated guidance will be made available on 11th July 2022.
  • The application deadline for Concept (Stage 0-2) projects is 23rd August 2022.
  • A Decision Making Panel will be held on 31st October 2022.

Expressions of Interest

  • An online version of our Expression of Interest form will launch for all partners on 11th July 2022.

Eligibility

  • An Eligibility Assessment for community organisations will launch on 11th July 2022.

Please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us if you have any questions.

You may contact your project officer or PlacesforEveryone@sustrans.org.uk directly.

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Protected: Components of a Behaviour Change Plan

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Roadspace Reallocation in Scotland

In the recording below, we hear from Anna Gale from Public Health Scotland, who give an overview of the findings and recommendations from the Health Impact Assessment.

Find out more about the Health Impact Assessment and Rapid Evidence Review here: https://www.publichealthscotland.scot/publications/road-space-reallocation-in-scotland/

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Engage • Inspire • Learn News PfE Places for Everyone

Active Travel in Europe

Introduction

We hear from a fantastic line up of speakers who present and share experiences of the increase of temporary active travel interventions and strategies during the pandemic in Europe, and how these can shape the way for future long-term measures and solutions. By coming together and learning from each other, it may be possible to keep this momentum going – to transform temporary solutions into more permanent implementations and accelerate the development of sustainable active travel infrastructure across Europe.

The event poster for the Active Travel in Europe webinar series
The event poster for the Active Travel in Europe webinar series

Paris

Clotilde Imbert, Director of Copenhagenize France, presents case studies from Paris, a city that has seen an increase in temporary cycle paths but also a high increase in cycling since the beginning of the pandemic. In addition, the mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, has an ambitious strategy, ‘Plan Vélo’ to transform Paris into a cycle-friendly city.

According to European Cyclists’ Federation, since the pandemic, France has added €300m in funding for the country’s cycling infrastructure. In the opinion column, ‘A unique opportunity to speed up the implementation of bicycle plans‘ on Copenhagenize’s website, Clotilde expands on her view of the possibilities and strategies that she believes should take place as a next step in creating permanent active travel infrastructure in France.

Brussels

Florine Cuignet, Policy Officer of GRACQ, shares how GRACQ represents cyclists and promotes cycling in the french-speaking parts of Belgium. According to European Cyclists’ Federation, Brussels is one of the cities that implemented the most cycle lanes during the pandemic in Europe. In addition, the country added almost €480m in their cycling infrastructure budget in response to the pandemic.

Last year the Belgian federal government, for the first time, published a cycling action plan for the country. The plan consists of 52 action points that will facilitate and promote cycling, which will be implemented by 2024.

EuroVelo

Ed Lancaster, Director of EuroVelo at the independent non-profit association European Cyclists’ Federation, presents case studies from rural areas in Europe. EuroVelo (European cycle route network) is a cooperation between different national and regional partners. The aim is to ensure that there are very high quality European-grade cycle routes and networks across Europe.

In January, EuroVelo presented the news that cycling on the EuroVelo routes have continued rising since the pandemic. In addition, ECF is also partner for the cross-border BIGIMUGI project that ‘aims at developing cycling mobility for all in rural areas situated along EuroVelo 3’.

Berlin

Ragnhild Sørensen shares more about work that the Berlin-based organisation, Changing Cities, do. As many other cities, Berlin has created pop-up cycle lanes during the pandemic, something that has not been appreciated by all political parties. The pop-up cycle lanes were monitored and developed according to feedback. The organisation has also launched the campaign Kiezblocks in Berlin, where more than 50 local initiatives want to limit the permeability of the road network for motorised individual transport (MIT) while prioritising walking and cycling on non-arterial streets. Kiezblock is a strategy for transformational urban adaptation, initiated by locals.

Panel Session

In this panel session, we welcome back all keynote speakers to answer pre-submitted and unanswered questions. The panel session will also include discussion around key themes identified throughout the series, including:

– Shared learning

– Behaviour and culture

– Opportunities and constraints

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Behaviour Change Interventions – Information Sheets

Evidence suggests that the most efficient mechanism for boosting active travel is a mix of interventions that complement each other (e.g. infrastructure interventions and behavioural interventions like a route planning training).

In Places for Everyone we therefore ask applicants to design a mix of behavioural interventions alongside their infrastructure projects, and present these in a behaviour change plan.

Intentionally developing and implementing a plan of activities will increase the use of new infrastructure at the outset and ultimately increase the impact it has.

Start by considering your local context (the local people and organisations), engage and listen. Design a plan just as you would design infrastructure; in a context specific way and in response to feedback. This may it take more time but is well worth it and important.

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Engage • Inspire • Learn News PfE

Community Engagement & Behaviour Change in Places for Everyone

Introduction

This mini-series is presented as six bite-sized, interactive tutorials on understanding and delivering community engagement and behaviour change in Places for Everyone projects.

This includes a practical guide to behaviour change strategies and interventions, as well as insight into community engagement, co-production, and the types of community sector organisations. Please note that you can find the references and relevant resources at the bottom of this page.

This mini-series is currently a work in progress. Your feedback will help shape future sessions.

Developing a Behaviour Change Plan

In this session, we cover:

  • Why behaviour change plans are important;
  • What behaviour change plans should include;
  • Community engagement vs behaviour change;
  • Involving seldom-heard groups;
  • Selecting interventions; and
  • Key points to remember.

Putting Theory into Practice

The session above, “Developing a Behaviour Change Plan”, mentions that one of the most effective mechanisms for boosting active travel is a mix of measures that complement each other. Infrastructure is just one measure we can use. In this session, we take a practical look at how to put together an effective programme that will result in a greater diversity of people using the infrastructure.

Introduction to Behaviour Change

In this session, we cover:

  • What is behaviour change?
  • ISM and Shifting Normal models
  • COM-B and the Behaviour Change Wheel
  • Tying it all together using a real life example
  • Making things happen

Introduction to Community Sector Organisations

In this session we’re going to look at community organisations in a bit more depth. We cover:

  • Explanation of the terms Community Sector, Third sector and Voluntary sector
  • Types of community organisation
  • Legal structures
  • Social enterprises and BIDs

Community Engagement and Co-production

Coming soon!

References and relevant resources

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Case Studies News News & Opinion Places for Everyone Project/Department Filtering

Opening the Loch Indaal Way

An opening event was held in October 2021, attended by local children from Port Charlotte Primary School with music provided by the Islay Pipe Band. Credit: ©2021, Islay Community Access Group, all rights reserved.

The Loch Indaal Way joins the communities of Port Charlotte and Bruichladdich via a safe, accessible and traffic-free route.

Prior to this, the sole existing link between the two communities was a section of the A847 carriageway, a national speed limit road which offers little protection to those walking wheeling and cycling on the island.

The newly completed off-road route has already proved popular with local residents and business owners, with its frequency of use expected to greatly increase when the tourist season returns.

Making waves in rural design

The Loch Indaal Way provides 2.53km of traffic-free route between the Islay communities of Bruchladdich and Port Charlotte. Credit: ©2021, Lisa Irvine/Sustrans, all rights reserved.

The Loch Indaal Way project was spearheaded by the Islay Community Access Group (ICAG), a local network of volunteers with a vision to increase health and wellbeing through greater outdoor accessibility.

Patrick McGrann, Head of the ICAG, said:

“ICAG, a small voluntary group, worked for 6 years to deliver the Loch Indaal Way. We are extremely proud of our new community asset .To see local folk and visitors of all ages and abilities enjoying access to the countryside is heart warming. We have involved our community throughout and all have ownership and satisfaction of a job well done.”

Pat McGrann, Head, Islay Community Access Group

With the support of Sustrans’ Places for Everyone programme, ICAG secured the a large part of the funding to deliver the 2.53km off-road active travel route.

Sustrans and ICAG previously worked together to deliver the lauded Three Distilleries Path at Port Ellen, a popular 5km active travel route which takes in the Laphroaig, Lagavulin and Ardbeg distilleries.

Emily Gait, Infrastructure Coordinator for Sustrans, said:

“The Loch Indaal Way is a great example of where a community have worked together to create a project which meets the needs of the people who live and visit the area. Inclusive designs and strong community backing have been key to the ultimate success of this project.

Going forward, we hope this inspires other small communities across Scotland to nurture their own walking, wheeling and cycling ambitions.”

Emily Gait, Infrastructure Coordinator, Sustrans

Key features of the route include three upgraded and newly created crossings, as well as landscaping and placemaking initiatives such as the provision of comfortable seating areas and shrubbery sections.

Smooth gradients and minimal placement of steps also maximise accessibility for users with limited mobility.

Change through community

New and upgraded crossings, minimal steps and barriers, as well as added seating areas and landscaping initiatives were fundamental to the designs. Credit: ©2021, Lisa Irvine/Sustrans, all rights reserved.

The proposals to create a new off-road walking, wheeling and cycling route between Port Charlotte and Bruichladdich received popular community support from the outset.

Through an proactive and considered period of engagement, ICAG worked closely with local landowners to secure necessary land donations to make the path a reality.

The local Bruichladdich Distillery also became involved in the promotion and funding behind the project, even entering into a maintenance agreement with ICAG to ensure to path stays fit for purpose.

AJ Cunningham, Operations Manager at Bruichladdich Distillery, said:

“Even before the path was finalised, it was being adopted by a lot of locals. I don’t think this was out of them being inquisitive, either. It’s just a really enjoyable and risk-free way to walk where they didn’t have that option before.

I don’t think it could’ve worked out any better unless you took it all the way out to Bridgend!”.

AJ Cunningham, Operations Manager, Bruichladdich Distillery

Evident local enthusiasm for project only further increased as construction got well underway against the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic.

A safer, healthier future

An opening event for the Loch Indaal Way took place in October 2021, featuring attendees from Port Charlotte Primary School and the Islay Pipe Band. Credit: ©2021, Islay Community Access Group, all rights reserved.

At an opening event in October of last year, children from Port Charlotte Primary School led a procession along the Loch Indaal Way from the Port Ban war memorial to Bruichladdich Town Hall.

They were joined on-route by local residents, members of ICAG and the local Baptist Minister, as well as the musical stylings of the Islay Pipe Band.

After passing several renowned destinations, including the Bruichladdich Distillery, the event culminated in a ceremonial ribbon cutting, which officially opened the route for all users to enjoy.

Children from Port Charlotte Primary School have provided artworks depicting key attractions along the route, including St. Kiaran’s Church and Loch Idaal House lighthouse. Credit: ©2021, Islay Community Access Group, all rights reserved.

Six months on, and The Loch Indaal Way is now an indispensable part of daily life on Islay.

A local group of swimmers use the path for convenient access to the beach as part of weekly meet-ups.

Attendees of St Kiaran’s Church hold fortnightly walks along the path.

A recently installed cycle repair station has also been well received by the community, ensuring daily errands, active commutes and leisure trips are able to continue with minimal disruption.

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Case Studies News News & Opinion Places for Everyone

First phase complete for £10.6m Inverness City Active Travel Network

Extending from Raigmore Interchange to the Golden Bridge, a new walking, wheeling and cycling link funded by Places for Everyone has been officially opened in Inverness.

The Raigmore Active Travel Link, will enable a safe, traffic-free option for those wishing to access Raigmore Estate, Inverness Campus, Inverness Shopping Park.

The accessible route also smartly joins up with other active travel infrastructure in the area to provide connections with Raigmore Hospital, local employers and onwards to retail and residential areas.

Accessibility in design

The Raigmore Active Travel Link is the first major phase of the landmark £10.6m Inverness City Active Travel Network to be completed.

As the first Places for Everyone project to be awarded Category 4 status in the Highlands, this marks a significant moment for the programme.

The wide route delivers a smooth and graded surface for users to make access to key destinations as convenient as possible.

The Raigmore Active Travel Link has been designed to provide a low gradient route, reducing the effects of the steep hill leading up to the Raigmore Community, providing a wide walking, wheeling and cycling ramp with rest areas for all users to enjoy.

The existing stairs which joined Raigmore Community to the interchange have been upgraded to tie into the new design, to ensure quick direct access.

The next phases of this project involve working with Transport Scotland and Sustrans at Raigmore Interchange.

Additionally, work is beginning to look at the potential for active and bus infrastructure linking the Interchange to the city centre along Millburn Road, utilising active travel and Bus Partnership Funding.

Consultation and engagement on these future phases will take place during 2022.

The site was officially opened by Elected Members, Raigmore Community Council, and the Primary 5 pupils from Raigmore Primary School nearby, who are Junior Road Safety Officers (JRSOs) for the school .

These JSROs are an important part of the primary school as they help raise road safety awareness and promote road safety issues to everyone in the school and the wider community, and the pupils have been very eager to learn about the new infrastructure which has been created in their local area.

Pupils from Raigmore Primary School joined Council staff last week to learn about the new link. Video: The Highland Council.

The pupils joined Council staff on site last week to learn about the active travel infrastructure and to be part of some filming on the active travel link. 

Bet McAllister, Depute Provost of Inverness said:

“This is the first large active travel investment in Inverness which Highland Council have delivered in partnership with our project partners and funders Sustrans, through their Places for Everyone fund.  To have a significant, high quality investment enabling safe, direct routes for walking, wheeling and cycling will help to encourage local people to be more active for everyday journeys, while also reducing our impact on climate change.  We celebrate the opening of this link today, but we are looking forward to the significant future investment which is planned as part of the Active Travel Network over the coming years.”

Bet McAllister, Depute Provost of Inverness

The Raigmore Active Travel Link has been funded through Sustrans’ Places for Everyone programme as part of the Inverness City Active Travel Network, a £10.6m active travel project investing in key walking, wheeling and cycling routes throughout the city.

Maelle Ducreux, Infrastructure Coordinator for Sustrans, said:

“The new Raigmore Active Travel Link will have an immediate positive impact on people walking, wheeling, and cycling between the Campus, Raigmore Estate and Inverness City Centre. These benefits will be felt further when improvements planned for Raigmore Interchange and Millburn Corridor are implemented. The development has also provided the opportunity to reinstate native tree species along the embankment which not only make the route more attractive but will provide valuable shielding from the trunk road”.

Maelle Ducreux, Sustrans

The Active Travel Link took 40 weeks to complete, and was constructed by Pat Munro, a local contractor who won the tender for this work. Mark Smith, Contracts Manager at Pat Munro, said:

“The Raigmore Active Travel Link has been a great project to be involved in and we’re delighted it is now open to the public.

The Raigmore community has been very understanding throughout the construction so we’d like to thank them, once again, for their patience. We hope the local community and others travelling by foot, bike or wheel enjoy using the travel link for many years to come.”

Mark Smith, Pat Munro

Munro Ross, Chair of Raigmore Community Council, said:

“This has been an exemplar project in terms of community engagement and professional work taking place in our community. We look forward to engaging with future projects in the local area, the bar has now been set in terms of engagement and expectations.”

Munro Ross, Raigmore Community Council
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Case Studies News News & Opinion Places for Everyone Project/Department Filtering

Transformational active travel project soon to begin in Stirling

From left to right: Clackmannshire Council Leader Cllr Ellen Forson with dog Loki, Stirling Council Leader Cllr Scott Farmer, Stirling Council Depute Leader Cllr Chris Kane, Sustrans Portfolio Director for Scotland Karen McGregor, Environment Advisor at the University of Stirling Amy Gove-Kaney. Photo: Stirling Council/Whyler Photos.

Construction of the Walk, Cycle, Live Stirling project is set to begin in March of this year.

A landmark project for the city, the scheme intends to not only improve safety and accessibility for those travelling by foot and wheel, but also seeks to increase economic activity and footfall for local businesses.

The project received £6.8m in funding from Places for Everyone, as well as £2.5m of Scottish Government investment from the City Region Deal and £258k from Stirling Council’s developer contributions allocation.

The city-wide plan also presents Stirling Council and partners with new place-making and tourism opportunities along the new routes, with the infrastructure also laying the foundations for future connections to Clackmannanshire and the wider Forth Valley region.

A detailed look

The project will deliver two main connections throughout the wider city. Illustration: Stirling Council

6.5km of new infrastructure will be created in total, smoothly interlinking with existing but currently disconnected routes across the city in order to connect communities, businesses and higher education institutes throughout Stirling for active travel for the first time.

Route one will provide a safe and accessible route between Stirling Train station and the University of Stirling, taking in iconic landmarks like Old Stirling Bridge and the National Wallace Monument along the way.

Route two will bridge the gaps between Forth Valley College and the City Centre along Albert Place, Dumbarton Road and Raploch Road, under the shadow of Stirling Castle.

The wider picture

The two new routes will pass iconic sites such as Stirling Castle and Wallace Monument. Photo: Stirling Council/Whyler Photos.

In attendance at a launch event for the project alongside local councillors, residents and business owners, Sustrans’ Portfolio Director Karen McGregor said:

“Walk, Cycle, Live Stirling is a truly transformative project that we at Sustrans are excited to be working on as part of our Places for Everyone programme. The project will make walking, wheeling and cycling safer and more enjoyable for everyone, making it easier for people to move between the iconic landmarks that make Stirling the unique place that it is.”

Karen McGregor, Sustrans

Stirling Council Leader, Cllr Farmer said:

“For the first time ever we’ll be able to create seamless sustainable travel options that link the institutions and businesses of our City with their local communities, setting a new standard of local active travel infrastructure.

This investment will make it easier to walk or wheel around Stirling and we hope this improved and increased access will not only meet the growing demands for better active travel infrastructure, but embed a culture that embraces cycling, walking and wheeling in the everyday lives of the people who live, work and visit Stirling.”

Cllr Farmer, Stirling Council Leader

As one of the cornerstone projects of the £90.2million Stirling and Clackmannanshire City Region Deal, Walk, Cycle, Live Stirling delivers connections which extend far beyond the city itself, whilst also further emboldening the Scottish Government’s plan to tackle climate change.

Clackmannanshire Council Leader, Ellen Forson said:

“I am delighted to see this project start to take shape. It will improve connectivity for our residents by providing a link to routes already established in Clackmannanshire, and is a great example of partnership working through the Stirling & Clackmannanshire City Region Deal.”

Cllr Forson, Clackmannanshire Council Leader

Scottish Government Economy Secretary Kate Forbes said:

“These walking and wheeling corridors will promote more sustainable travel, healthier lifestyles and opportunities for tourism while connecting Stirling’s educational institutions, businesses and communities.

This is helping deliver the bold and ambitious actions we need to help reduce carbon emissions to net zero and encourage sustainable economic growth.”

Kate Forbes, Scottish Government Economy Secretary

Initial construction will start in tandem on Raploch Road East near the King’s Knot, and Airthrey Road near the University.

The project is due to be completed by March 2024, whereupon Walk, Cycle, Live Stirling will serve as a major active travel network for communities across the wider Stirling landscape.

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Project Portal new version run-through

Julian Cram, Senior Web Developer and Data Base Administrator of Sustrans Scotland, provides a run-through of the changes made to the Project Portal.

Key updates

  • Completely new styling to improve readability and usability
  • Accessibility of the interface now meets WGAG guidelines wherever possible
  • Greater device support with a more responsive interface
  • Revisions to some pages to make most used areas or features more prominent
  • Updated navigation menu to make moving around the site easier
  • Major performance improvement.

Contact us

If partners have any questions relating to the Project Portal and the changes that have been made, please contact projectportal@sustrans.org.uk