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Case Studies Engage · Inspire · Learn Knowledge Sharing News Places for Everyone

What does inclusivity look like in public space?

From engaging with the community to designing infrastructure, how can we ensure that public space is welcoming and safe for everyone?

Partners from local authorities and organisations around Scotland were invited to hear from a variety of guest speakers on how to create more inclusive spaces.

These sessions are part of the Places for Everyone event programme – Engage · Inspire · Learn

Design Justice Network

First, we hear from Leah Lockhart and Raina Armstrong, both members of the Design Justice Network. Design Justice is an exploration of how design might be led by marginalized communities, dismantle structural inequality and advance collective liberation. The Design Justice principles are a practical framework for planning work and decision making. Below, you can find the recording of the session and you can access additional resources here.

Queering Public Space

How do you make transport and public space more inclusive? Are there design aspects that can help to make these safer and more welcoming? Can the organisation of transport and public space help to desist hate crimes and gender-based violence? We hear from Dr Ammar Azzouz and Mei-Yee Man Oram of Arup, and Professor Pippa Catterall of University of Westminster. They draw upon recent research to explore these various pressing issues. Below, you can find the recording of the session and you can access the full Queering the Public Space report here.

Make Space for Girls

Last, we hear from Imogen Clark and Susannah Walker, co-founders of a new charity, Make Space for Girls. It was set up to campaign for parks and similar public spaces to be welcoming to girls and young women. Many parks, play equipment and public spaces are designed for the default male. Therefore, Make Space for Girls use research, consultation, engagement and education to drive an approach to the planning and development of parks and similar public spaces. Undoubtedly, these spaces should recognise the different needs of girls and young women and should find ways to meet those needs. Below, you can find the recording of the session.